Posts filed under interior design

Hues Hair Richmond, Melbourne Australia - Adriana Hanna

“The client for Hues Hair came to architect Adriana Hanna with a pragmatic brief and few preconceived ideas of what the space could be. Despite a tight budget and timeframe, the client’s trust allowed Hanna to charge forward with her thrilling design. Located in a suburb flooded with competing salons, Hues Hair is unlike any other in the streetscape. In fact, it’s unlike a typical Melbourne salon altogether. Keen to avoid the usual salon window tack, where customers are displayed as if they were visual merchandise, Hanna looked to create a much more private and intimate experience. With the salon’s clientele largely garnered by word of mouth rather than passing foot traffic, Hues Hair has an intentionally quiet street presence. Its modest storefront creates a sense of exclusivity – only those in the know would realize that the storefront conceals a hair salon behind its doors. The hair stations are not visible from the street, but organized across the tenancy as a series of seemingly randomly placed objects. In fact, the three-sided hair stations are located with calculated purpose, positioned to obscure views to and from each station, ensuring a sense of privacy for individual clients. Citing Memphis Group founder Ettore Sottsass and contemporary Melbourne-based artist Emily Floyd as influences, Hanna injected the interior with a playful use of colour and simple geometric forms. Imbued with only two colours, peach (which Hanna’s research suggested was the most flattering tone for the complexion) and forest green, the salon’s interior gains a sense of order and unity. The two colours are applied with deep consideration, sharpening the geometric forms and clarifying the visual reading of positive and negative space. The ceiling grid was retained due to budget restraints, but its regular and rational geometry is reinforced by green paint over a peach backdrop and maps the warped coordinates of the hair stations beneath it. The geometric forms appear at varying scales. Narrow pointed archways are overlapped with oversized circles, triangles and arches. When you look at these oversized forms, which are flattened by the use of the peach and forest green, your understanding of scale and depth becomes dislocated. It’s only the Paola Navone Eumenes chairs that help you identify how these forms relate to the human scale or suggest the possibility of habitation. As you traverse from one space to another, the perception of the colours shifts. What looks peach in one room appears white in the next – a visual game reminiscent of James Turrell’s work. Mirrors, which are essential to every salon, are also instrumental to the design. Influenced by installation artist Jeppe Hein, Hanna has used mirrors to visually complete geometries of half forms, confusing the eye between the physical and the reflected. Between the pure geometries, the strict use of colour and the deceptive use of reflection, the interior, riddled with visual games, has a hyper-stylized feel that has more in common with a gallery space or installation than a typical hair salon. The thrilling visual playground that Hues Hair offers sets it apart from any other salon.” - adriana hanna / architectureau

Tealive, Melbourne Australia - Fretard Design

"FRETARD Design has expertly delivered Australia’s first Tealive store, introducing the successful Malaysian bubble tea company to Melbourne’s bustling CBD. A colourful tea stop in the city’s largest transit hub, Southern Cross Station, Benjamin Frétard has designed a visually stimulating space that attracts customers with vibrant purples and yellows and energises the spirit even before the first sip. A striking ceiling installation, representative of the way in which the straw perforates the bubble tea lid, adds intrigue and texture to the store layout while emphasising the bold brand colours and quirky personality. Pops of colour in the wall tiles offset the neutral base and concrete flooring, capturing the gaze and directing it towards the countertop where the eye is met by friendly staff and splashes of purple, teal, and yellow. The partial green wall breathes natural life into already vibrant space, creating a sense of wellness, with a subtle nod to the abundance of greenery found in the many Tealive stores across Asia. Minimal seating and bench space provide for the consistent flow of traffic and fast-paced service demanded of the transient environment within the Station." - fretard design

Whitlam Place Fitzroy, Melbourne Australia - The Design Files, Freadman White + Anon Studio

Whitlam Place is the brainchild of Melbourne based architecture design studio Freadman White in collaboration with Anon Studio aka, Marcello Donati (Stay tuned for a tour of Marcello’s own penthouse apartment in Whitlam Place tomorrow!) In an environment where ‘trend-driven’ multi-residential buildings are popping up quickly and re-shaping Melbourne’s suburbs and skylines, Ilana Freadman and Michael White of Freadman White were eager to pursue a design strategy that was informed by its local context. This boutique development of 11 apartments sit opposite the Fitzroy Town Hall and offer a modern interpretation of civic-minded architecture, inspired by both European urbanity (e.g. Aldo Rossi and Giorgio Grassi) and seminal Melbourne design (see local legends Robin Boyd and Roy Grounds). This might all sound like a hectic mash-up, but Whitlam Place seamlessly connects historical references with a hefty dose of Fitzroy local vibes. In archi-terms, think somewhere between ‘International Style’ and ‘Melbourne post-modernism’! The exterior of Whitlam Place makes an immediate impact from street level, as the solid form of the building hovers over a generously light-filled entrance level. The architects describe this dynamic as ‘balancing material weight against structural lightness, presence against permeability.’ With it’s distinctive surface treatment, the oxidised copper and fluted exterior detailing of the building reference the civic strength of the neighbouring Fitzroy Town Hall. The apartments of Whitlam Place are designed to ‘amplify their site’s natural attributes’ the architects describe, as full-height sliding glass panels create direct connections between each home and the leafy Fitzroy surrounds. The design blends artisanal practices and attention to detail, and combines ‘textures of warm timber and stone with ceramics and steel, brass and copper.’ While the architects reflect on the ‘sobering realities of town planning, objectors, and latent conditions of the construction phase’, these bureaucratic hurdles were unable to quash any of the ambition of this incredible project. Whitlam Place brings together historical archetypes, contemporary design, artisanal practices, and a sense of playfulness (hello those neons in the entry!) resulting in a truly bespoke, brilliantly bold, and unapologetically creative building. More of this please, Melbourne!"Whitlam Place is the brainchild of Melbourne based architecture design studio Freadman White in collaboration with Anon Studio aka, Marcello Donati (Stay tuned for a tour of Marcello’s own penthouse apartment in Whitlam Place tomorrow!) In an environment where ‘trend-driven’ multi-residential buildings are popping up quickly and re-shaping Melbourne’s suburbs and skylines, Ilana Freadman and Michael White of Freadman White were eager to pursue a design strategy that was informed by its local context. This boutique development of 11 apartments sit opposite the Fitzroy Town Hall and offer a modern interpretation of civic-minded architecture, inspired by both European urbanity (e.g. Aldo Rossi and Giorgio Grassi) and seminal Melbourne design (see local legends Robin Boyd and Roy Grounds). This might all sound like a hectic mash-up, but Whitlam Place seamlessly connects historical references with a hefty dose of Fitzroy local vibes. In archi-terms, think somewhere between ‘International Style’ and ‘Melbourne post-modernism’! The exterior of Whitlam Place makes an immediate impact from street level, as the solid form of the building hovers over a generously light-filled entrance level. The architects describe this dynamic as ‘balancing material weight against structural lightness, presence against permeability.’ With it’s distinctive surface treatment, the oxidised copper and fluted exterior detailing of the building reference the civic strength of the neighbouring Fitzroy Town Hall. The apartments of Whitlam Place are designed to ‘amplify their site’s natural attributes’ the architects describe, as full-height sliding glass panels create direct connections between each home and the leafy Fitzroy surrounds. The design blends artisanal practices and attention to detail, and combines ‘textures of warm timber and stone with ceramics and steel, brass and copper.’ While the architects reflect on the ‘sobering realities of town planning, objectors, and latent conditions of the construction phase’, these bureaucratic hurdles were unable to quash any of the ambition of this incredible project. Whitlam Place brings together historical archetypes, contemporary design, artisanal practices, and a sense of playfulness (hello those neons in the entry!) resulting in a truly bespoke, brilliantly bold, and unapologetically creative building. More of this please, Melbourne!" - the design files / miriam mcgarry

Armadale Residence, Melbourne Australia - Travis Walton Architecture

Retro glam vibes and an ultra-luxe attitude restore this former Spanish consulate to glory with an unapologetically bold and contemporary re-imagining. Seamlessly connected spaces and high-gloss finishes artfully blur the line between family home and luxury hotel, creating a striking modern residence that’s as practical as it is party-ready. This renovation and extension to an existing art deco building was predicated on the clients’ desire to create a comfortable family home that could also function as a sophisticated entertaining space."Retro glam vibes and an ultra-luxe attitude restore this former Spanish consulate to glory with an unapologetically bold and contemporary re-imagining. Seamlessly connected spaces and high-gloss finishes artfully blur the line between family home and luxury hotel, creating a striking modern residence that’s as practical as it is party-ready. This renovation and extension to an existing art deco building was predicated on the clients’ desire to create a comfortable family home that could also function as a sophisticated entertaining space." - travis walton architecture

KICKS Sports Bar, Melbourne Australia - ZWEI Interiors Architecture

"Conceived as a contemporary interpretation of a classic sports bar, KICKS, is a celebration of all things sport. Subtly referencing the built form of athletic arenas and sporting equipment, the space is presented like an empty playing field, waiting for the action to begin." - zwei interiors architecture

Pakta Restaurant, Barcelona Spain - El Equipo Creativo

“Pakta means ´union´ in the Quechua language of Peru: union of two cultures, union of two gastronomies. The interior design emerges from this same idea, considering that Japanese cuisine is the basis of the nikkei gastronomy but wrapped in Peruvian tastes, colors, traditions and ingredients. "Pakta means ´union´ in the Quechua language of Peru: union of two cultures, union of two gastronomies. The interior design emerges from this same idea, considering that Japanese cuisine is the basis of the nikkei gastronomy but wrapped in Peruvian tastes, colors, traditions and ingredients. The basic elements of the restaurant such as the bars, the kitchen and the furniture are designed with a clear reference to the architecture of the traditional Japanese taverns. An explosion of colors evocative of Peru embraces the space like a second skin, achieved by the use of a direct reference to the Peruvian looms. In the entrance, the sake and pisco bar acts as a filter between the interior and exterior of the venue. It is a three dimensional framework which serves as a shelf, visual filter and product display stand. Presiding over the dining area is the sushi bar. Structurally speaking, it is completely antagonistic to the sake and pisco bar as it is composed of three heavy, luminous stone pieces. Closing the space at the end of the dining area is the kitchen, conceived as a luminous box which allows the cooks inside to be observed through a layer of glass panels with different degrees of transparency. Using three different types of transversal sections, together with some longitudinal pieces, the looms embrace the space creating a changing colorful rhythm.The lighting is developed in collaboration with BMLD Lighting Design. The main goal is to create an atmosphere which will put the focus on the served dish and the food. The concept used for the lighting, “the fusion between dark and light, simplicity and color” is achieved by using dim light in some of the looms, thereby creating rhythm and dynamism." - el equipo creativo

Lenny 3206 Albert Park, Melbourne Australia - Design By Golden

"Inspired by its location on a breezy bayside boulevard, Lenny 3206 takes the site’s heritage bones in a bold but youthful new direction, coming alive through preppy pastel tones, robust materials and a textural palette that beckons guests to stay awhile. A nod to the café’s cursive brand identity and the adjacent bay, organic motifs are peppered throughout the space, from the shapely communal table and arched pendant lighting, to the central bar rendered in jagged rock formations." - design by golden

Pot Bellied Pig Cafe, Dublin Ireland - Kingston Lafferty Design

"The brief for this design was to create a fun, exciting and vibrant café space to tie in with the branding and name, and equally appeal to the broad demographic in the urban Rathmines area. The concept KLD presented was hugely inspired by the pig. A large part of the brief was that the business would be focused on catering to the young, professional, brunch market so the design required a cool aesthetic with maximum capacity for covers, providing both takeaway and eat in options, as well as an outdoor area to enjoy. The main challenge of this design was the small space and how to create multiple experiences within the one small space. The solution was clever zoning, identified by stark changes in materials. a particularly innovative design installation of tubed lighting was designed by KLD for the front, initial entrance part of the café. Texture and tactility were imperative to the overall design. KLD used a mix of tiles, brass, velvets, leather and lush planting for interest and excitement throughout. Nature and greenery were drawn in to enhance the palette of pink and green. The building’s limited natural light and a long orientation encouraged the design team to add a lot of mirror in order to bounce light and reflect the space, giving the illusion of a wider frame to the café. A mixture of velvet caged booths and green leather booths provide cosy seating and play on that idea of different experiences. Another side to creating different zones, related to the vast market in the area. Clientele was likely to be varied and so seating was design to cater for everyone from groups, couples, singles and families. The front tube installation was originally inspired by the pig, and specifically the pig’s snout. By grouping multiple tubes on the ceiling and adding lighting in these tubes (some in the shape akin to the pig’s curled tail) the brand was reinforced through the design. Undulated fire rated tubes were lined with a gradient of pink tones to draw the eye and lead customers into the main space, seeking to see more. The tube installation also serves the purpose of framing the coffee making process, enhancing the experience for the customer nipping quickly in for their morning coffee. Ultimately this design was a based on a youthful new business launching and making a name for itself in the area. It was an ambitious project in the highly competitive café/brunch market and the KLD team knew the importance of a strong design to help push the business and in offering something different and exciting in the market." - kingston lafferty design

Toorak Triangle House, Melbourne Australia - Molecule Studio

"The Triangle House is a new home in Toorak, designed for a family of five. The clients’ brief requested a ‘beach house’ in an urban context with qualities including natural light, robust materials and a strong connection to the landscape. The architectural form is conceived as an elevated sinuous element, a timber-clad boat sitting on a rocky breakwater. The corner prow of the upper floor projects into the street, anchored by the dark recessive ground floor mass. The Triangle House is a thoughtful architectural response to a challenging site, creating a unique and small footprint home for its growing family." - molecule studio

Ester Apartment 2.0, Berlin Germany - Ester Bruzkus

"The move from one apartment to another in the same building provided the ideal opportunity for Ester Bruzkus to revisit the identical design problem with fresh ideas. The new design - Ester’s Apartment 2.0 - is an expression of both restraint and opulence through its efficient planning, its playful use of color, its exceptional lighting, its custom-designed furniture, and its carefully detailed material volumes. The apartment feels bright and spacious like an airy open loft because its space extends from east facade to the west and sunlight enters from sunrise to sunset. It is intricately planned to offer a rich variety of spaces – and to make the most of hidden storage - despite its small actual size – just 80square meters inside. Exterior rooms expand the concept onto the roof terrace, where a variety of outdoor volumes, spaces and framed views create a rooftop garden." - ester bruzkus